RITA



Home

Overview

FAQ

Glossary

Policies

Prices

Contact

About Us

Order

Records In The Attic:
Glossary

FILE FORMATS OFFERED:
or, the differences between MP3, WAV and CD-A

MP3
MP3 is one of the most popular sound formats for music recording. The MP3 encoding system combines good compression (small files) with high quality.  A typical MP3 record album will take about 50MB of disk space, roughly 1/10 of the space of the .WAV file it replaces.

Sounds stored in the MP3 format have the extension MP3

Because of their relatively small size, MP3 files can be downloaded via the Web, and stored easily on your computer's hard drive.

Notes about MP3 files

MP3 files can be used with CD-Burning Software Applications to create CD-As.
MP3 files can be used with audio editing software.
MP3 files can not be played on stand alone CD players.
MP3 players will display generic track labels or manually entered song titles during playback.
You can replace generic track labels with song titles by "renaming" MP3 files stored on your hard drive.


CD-A or Redbook CD
This is the type of CD you buy in stores and play in your car CD player.

The first CD format which defined the music CD that could be played in all standalone CD players was called CD Digital Audio, CD-DA or just CD-A. The specifications for the CD-A format were set out in the 1980 "red book" standard developed by Philips and Sony. The Red Book standard specifies the data format for digital audio and the technical specifications for devices and media.

Notes about CD-A

Albums stored as CD-A files, whether the tracks are separated or not, can be played in any CD player.
A computer CD player will play individually separated tracks but will not read song titles or other information from this type of CD.
CD-A files can not be stored in a computer database to be searched, copied.  They can be converted into WAV or MP3 formats by "ripping" the CD.
CD-Burning Software Applications (such as Roxio) can create CD-A or Redbook CDs from MP3 and WAV files.


WAV
This format is used for storing sound in files and was developed jointly by Microsoft and IBM. It can be played by nearly all Windows applications that support sound.

Often used for storing high-quality, uncompressed sound, WAV files can contain CD-quality (44.1 KHz/16-bit) audio signals. CD-quality WAV files require relatively large amounts of memory roughly 10 MB per minute of music.

Sounds stored in the WAV format have the extension .WAV

Notes about WAV files

WAV files can be used with CD-Burning Software Applications to create CD-As.
WAV files can be used with audio editing software.
WAV files can not be played on stand alone CD players.
WAV players will display generic track labels or manually entered song titles during playback.
You can replace generic track labels with song titles by "renaming" WAV files stored on your hard drive.

TRACK SEPARATION:

The process of saving individual songs (tracks) as individual files.  More information here.

TRACK LABELING:

Manually typing in song titles to replace generic track identifiers.  More information here.

Once an album is recorded and the tracks are separated, the computer automatically labels individual songs with generic track identifiers ("Track 01," "Track 02," and so on).

MUSIC DOWNLOAD:

Once your albums have been played into our computers and converted to the format of your choice,  a single-customer-only web page is created.  Type or paste the URL we email you into your web browser to access your page and then download the files to your hard disk.  

   © 2005 - Records In the Attic